Rising Vehicle Repair Costs; Hybrid vs. Regular Car Debate; Car Buying Advice | Talking Cars #244

This week is an all-questions episode, where we answer as many audience questions as possible. Topics include recommending a vehicle to a first-time car buyer moving to the U.S. from Switzerland; what is the future of tire-pressure monitoring systems; can the higher price tag of a Corolla Hybrid be made back pretty quickly with fuel savings vs. the regular Corolla; why fender-benders are getting pricier to repair; and we end by giving advice about which vehicles are best-suited to elderly drivers. 

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SHOW NOTES
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01:07 – Question #1: What are some tips for buying a car for the first time?

06:22 – Question #2: What is the future of TPMS?

10:42 – Question #3: Is Mazda Miata a viable option for a daily commuter car?

13:10 – Question #4: can the higher price tag of a Corolla Hybrid be made back pretty quickly with fuel savings vs. the regular Corolla?

15:55 – Question #5: Is it smart to wait a year on purchasing a newly redesign model?

18:05 – Question #6: Why do newer cars have a higher repair price?

19:50 – Question #7: Which 3-row hybrid or electric luxury SUV is best suited for a family?

23:44 – Question #8: Which tires are best suited for climates with fluctuating temperatures?

25:42 – Question #9: What are the top rated vehicles for senior drivers?

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The Hidden Cost of Car Safety Features

The 25 New Cars for Senior Drivers

2015 Lexus NX Review

2018 Lexus RX350L Quick Drive

4K Review: 2018 Audi Q5 Quick Drive

4K Review: 2018 BMW X3 Quick Drive

2014 Honda Accord Hybrid review

2019 Kia Sorento Quick Drive

2020 Kia Soul Quick Drive

Redesigned Mazda MX-5 Keeps Miata Magic Going

4K Review: 2017 Mazda CX-5 Quick Drive

2016 Volvo XC90 Quick Drive

Chrysler Pacifica Redefines the Minivan

2013 Subaru BRZ first look

2019 Subaru Forester Quick Drive

2016 Tesla Model X Quick Drive

2019 Toyota Avalon Quick Drive

2019 Toyota Corolla Hatchback Quick Drive

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27 Comments on "Rising Vehicle Repair Costs; Hybrid vs. Regular Car Debate; Car Buying Advice | Talking Cars #244"

  1. I love fridays❤️
    Yaaaaaaaaassssss Consumer Reports!

  2. ХХХ AMATЕUR SЕХ VIDЕO - СLIСК НЕRЕ | February 28, 2020 at 5:23 PM | Reply

    🔥🔥🔥
    1:25 🔥💘
    👇 👇 👇 👇 👇💕

  3. I am looking at purchasing either the 2020 Nissan Murano, 2020 Hyundai Sante Fe, or 2020 Honda CR-V. Which one of these do you think is the better buy and why?

    • Stephen Jeffcoat | February 28, 2020 at 8:16 PM | Reply

      If you plan to keep it a long time, the Santa Fe will give you more bang for the buck; combined with better reliability than the other two and a great warranty. If you plan to trade it within the next 5 years get the CR-V because it will hold value better.

    • Darrell Borland | February 28, 2020 at 8:17 PM | Reply

      @Kenny Sanders…Kenny, the Murano may be in a different class than the others. Hyundai may be worth a look at…a lot for the money-point, according to CR. ‘Hope you get something you like…and please watch the games dealers play, from a guy who should have known better! LOL. thanks.

    • Luke Rinderknecht | February 28, 2020 at 9:42 PM | Reply

      In all honesty, the CX-5 😁

    • calvin B awesome | February 28, 2020 at 10:14 PM | Reply

      I’d go with the CR-V because it will most likely last the longest out of all of these. My grandparents had a CR-V and it made it to just over 180,000 miles with no major issues.

  4. rillloudmother | February 28, 2020 at 5:40 PM | Reply

    Lol, all this time I thought you guys were on about cars that talk…

  5. Note that the CRV hybrid has already been out for sometime in Europe. Also it uses a naturally aspirated engine so it will not be plagued with the oil dilution issue

  6. Back when I had a BRZ (2013), I bought 4 new sensors, reprogrammed the car using an ATEQ QuickSet, put the sensors into a pressure chamber made from PVC pipes, shoved it in the trunk, and didn’t have to worry about it. Now, I own a Honda, which has indirect system. Mazda also uses indirect system.

    • Luke Rinderknecht | February 28, 2020 at 9:41 PM | Reply

      Mazda has switched to a direct system in recent models. My 2017 CX-5 has in wheel sensors, but I just bought a second set of sensors from Costco for my winter tires. They were decently cheap and I don’t have to worry when I switch over in the winter.

  7. Just buy a tpms rest tool.

  8. Louis Carliner | February 28, 2020 at 8:06 PM | Reply

    There is one benefit of the hybrid versus the non-hybrid Corola, assuming that the fuel tank in both is of identical capacity would be the substantial convince of a substantial longer cruising range on long interstate highway trips!

  9. Louis Carliner | February 28, 2020 at 8:15 PM | Reply

    There is one thing that can be done to make EV models viable for long distance interstate highway trips. Is any consideration being give for the development of standardized families of long rang range quick exchangeable power packs? This would also make feasible ownership of EV for those living in rental apartment complexes. In this case, power pack exchange stations would be the analogue of traditional fueling service stations.

  10. So Toyota Corolla Hybrid is supposed to be reliable. You didn’t mention anything about maintenance between the hybrid and the non hybrid model, which was asked. On the other hand you spent about a minute talking about hybrid vs non hybrid which was not the question.

    • I think the maintenance will be lower on the hybrid corolla. Brakes are getting less wear, and motor is less stressed. Also you don’t have a starter motor to break down. Not that Toyota starters break though.

  11. AnalogueKid2112 | February 28, 2020 at 9:21 PM | Reply

    For EVs, as of early 2020 it really depends on what part of the US you live in. Someone in California or the Northeast should never have an issue finding charging on a road trip. But if you live in North Dakota, things are much more challenging.

  12. Luke Rinderknecht | February 28, 2020 at 9:45 PM | Reply

    In regards to the Miata question, I drive an NC MX-5 in the summer, and it could be my sole car if I really had to do it in a pinch, but it would be tough. The ND has even less space and less practical storage inside (ex: no glove box, bad cup holders) which would make it even less convenient.

  13. 2:05
    Justin get u a 2016 Lexus Ls600hL. It will have more features than many newer cars even though it’s on year older than your 2017 threshold.

  14. I would choose the Legacy over the Avalon, unless you’re focused on the Hybrid Avalon. The Soul rides too bumpy.

  15. Thanks for another great episode fellas.

  16. Great episode guys. Love the chemistry between you.

  17. My tpms light stays on all winter

  18. True TPMS story: Wife claims she never got any light on the dash and completely shredded a tire by driving on the highway while it was flat! Yeah, she also never heard that rim just grinding. Sigh…

  19. Key thing you all missed on the CR-V Hybrid – that will be AWD unlike the Accord. That is bound to add additional complexities (additional motor, ability to power front/rear axles separately, together etc.) – assuming it is not a mechanical AWD.

  20. CR is so brave for dissing Tesla Model X! Prepare for the fan-boy flamethrowers.

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